a fast fashion holdover, my personal finance homework + other updates

levis 501 ct at 11.06.14 PM

This is an old photo, but I posted it because it’s finally cold enough to break out the old wool socks + Birks combo.  Yes, I know it’s ugly, but I’m shameless, and for casual days lounging around, walking the dog, it’s not too offensive.

I’m wearing one of my favorite sweaters here.  It’s a 5 + year old cotton knit from Zara.  I think it’s true what the Luxe Strategist has said about fast fashion– they don’t all fall apart quickly.  Some do last, if you choose carefully and properly care for your clothes.  But I do think the quality can vary to the extreme at fast fashion retailers.  And quality is only one factor when deciding on what brands to buy from.  At this point, ethics and the environment drive my decisions more than anything else.

I just got back from a week in Cali where I gave a talk at a conference.

I was shocked to discover that the Forever 21 headquarters is now located in the very same neighborhood I grew up in (boooo!).  I’ve heard some terrible things about how they treat their employees, a culture of women bullying other women in the work place.  Why am I not surprised?

But anyway, since being back in NYC, I’ve been busy doing homework that my personal finance coach assigned to me.  She had me total up everything I spent in October and calculate the percentage of my take home pay that I spent on each category.  This is the breakdown of how much I should be spending in each category according to my coach:

housing 25-35%
savings 5-20%
utilities 5-10%
personal 5-10%
recreation 5-10%
food 5-15%
transportation 10-15%
clothes 2-7%
medical 5-10%
misc 2-5%
unsecured 5-10% (student loans, credit cards)
charity 10-15%

Turned out my biggest expenditure was on food.  I was shocked to find out I spent the same amount on food as rent!  Eek!  I don’t go out for fancy dinners, but I guess all those seamless orders + tip add up.  My coach challenged me to not order from Seamless at all in the month of November and cut my food bill in half.

Tonight I made cauliflower tacos (vegan) from the Thug Kitchen website.  It was really good.   I bought pre cut cole slaw to save time on food prep and toasted the tortillas on a frying pan instead of microwaving them to get a crunchier texture.  Tomorrow I’m trying the mushroom tacos recipe from NYT, for something a little different that will still use up all the leftover ingredients from tonight’s dinner.  Cooking every night is going to be a challenge but it will force me to be more creative and actually plan out my meals the night before.

I just finished reading The White Coat Investor, a book two friends from med school recommended.  I highly recommend you read if you’re also in the medical field.  And I just started reading Ikigai  (a japanese version of Hygge) [update:  I just finished reading it; it’s not well written; not a book I’d recommend unless you are very interested in the topic] and Why Buddhism is True  by Robert Wright, who was recently on the Secular Buddhism podcast, which if you have not listened to yet, you should.  It’s gold.   One of the most helpful episodes for me has been the podcast on perfectionism and the problem with comparing.

[outfit:  old zara knit sweater, levis 501 ct*, vietnam wool socks, birks]

 

closet mindfulness

tank-everlane
When my closet is in order, I am in order.
 My favorite place at home is my closet room.  I’m grateful to have an entire room dedicated to my wardrobe and dedicated to myself.  I don’t have a dining room.  I don’t have an office or a desk, but I have my closet room.  It’s a quiet place where I can get ready in peace.  What happens in my closet sets the mood for the entire day.  As such, I’m careful about what enters and ruthless about what should go.  With age, getting dressed feels easier.  I’m left with more energy to start my day and do better at work.   Continue reading “closet mindfulness”

a book recommendation for those who’ve already KonMaried their homes.

IMG_3965.jpgLast Christmas, I read Marie Kondo‘s book cover to cover on a 5 hour plane ride.  Since then, I’ve been struck by how her message really took off.  Comedian Ali Wong mentioned it in her hilarious Netflix special Baby Cobra, and then named her daughter Mari!  And even Emily Gilmore KonMaried her house in the recent Gilmore Girls revival special (also on Netflix).  Amazing!  Why did it take off?  Because it teaches us the power of “no” again? Did it reawaken something in us, without making us think about heavy emotional issues? Does the question “does this spark joy?” bring us back to our natural assertive state?   Continue reading “a book recommendation for those who’ve already KonMaried their homes.”