apt tour: the bedroom sofa is where I do my work

bedroom-sofa

According to my reader’s poll, a lot of you guys wanted to see my apartment, so here goes.  It’s daunting to photograph my whole apartment in one day, so I’m going to break it down and start a series of posts on small areas.  I’ll try to keep it authentic (that means no staging).

Let me start by saying, I love interior design.  My favorite past time is re-arranging furniture and coming up with new ideas on how to repurpose things.  My BF and I have lived in this apartment for about 4 years.  It’s come a long way on a small budget.  We live in a 750 sq ft railroad style apartment in an old run down four story walk up in NYC.  It’s size and layout has posed a lot of challenges, but I think we’ve been able to make it work.

🌻 Continue reading “apt tour: the bedroom sofa is where I do my work”

the feng shui of seams

cropped-capsule-wardrobe.jpg

I’m a big fan of form school feng shui, a branch of feng shui attuned to our natural tendency to seek safety and comfort at home. Form school is concerned mostly about the way we arrange furniture, but the same principles can be applied to almost anything, even clothes.

As I was folding laundry today, I realized that I had always been turned off by clothes with seams running down the middle of the front or back. Same goes for shoes. Ever notice a beautiful pair of boots from afar, only to become disappointed up close when you discover a seam running down to the tip? I could love everything about the silhouette, fabric, color, etc… but add a seam down the middle of it, and it’s ruined!

Continue reading “the feng shui of seams”

7 Practical Feng Shui Lessons for Apartment Living

minimography feng shui

Lately, I’ve been putting a lot of thought into how people are affected by their home environments. The concept of simple living addresses the amount of stuff we have but doesn’t really offer guidance on how to best arrange our things. KonMari taught us how to arrange our wardrobes and knick knacks but pretty much ends there. Feng Shui offers guidance but so much of it is based on superstition and quackish ideas about good fortune. So I was so happy to find a book about Feng Shui by Cathleen McCandless that actually made sense, and quickly read through it yesterday afternoon. There’s a particular school called ‘form’ Feng Shui that offers practical advice on how to reduce semi-conscious anxiety and stress in ourselves by arranging furniture in ways that maximize a sense of security. Much of the advice is a common sense approach to home safety, that when implemented has a noticeable calming psychological effect. Here are some tips that I thought were most notable from the book and particularly useful for urban apartment dwellers. This list takes you from the outside to the inside of your home.

1. Make sure your apartment # is clearly visible from the outside (should you ever need to call for help, you’ll be easier to find this way).

2. The entryway should be a well defined area with partial separation from the living space (to psychologically transition you from an alert-outside state to an inside-resting state). Continue reading “7 Practical Feng Shui Lessons for Apartment Living”

apt: plastic minimization principle

plastic minimization

Here’s a quick tip on how to create a better living space:  minimize the amount of plastic in your home. There are some exceptions but in general, plastic represents dead energy and if you are surrounded by a lot of plastic, chances are you are unhappy with your space.  One exception to this rule is with clear acrylic items, this durable clear material allows energy to flow through with minimal impact on the space.  My other exception is with household tools that get stowed away when not in use, ie. cleaning tools, this foot stool (pictured), because we still have to be practical ya know.

So look around you, find any plastic item you’re unhappy with and change it up!  Try swapping out that plastic cup for an inexpensive pretty mason jar or swap out that plastic electric fan for a stainless steel version instead. These small changes can make a huge impact!  (And don’t forget to recycle or donate your old stuff).