outfit: complimented

ootd monday harper tunic elizabeth suzann_1244

Today, a woman at work said to me “I really like the way you dress.”  And I jokingly replied “Oh like kind of frumpy?”  We both laughed.  I’ve always dressed a little different from the general population.  My sisters used to tease me about how I dressed like a homeless person, lol.  But anyway, I think this woman who complimented me today was being genuine and I felt good knowing someone else out there appreciates a non-traditional way of dressing.  It’s not like my outfits are loud or flamboyant but there are eccentric aspects to my clothes, like that giant pocket and those brown socks. I didn’t wear these shoes to work, BTW.  I changed out of them and into my oxfords before heading out the door.  A while back another one of my co-workers asked me where I bought my clothes.  She commented on how I always looked appropriate for work but that my clothes stood out to her.  I gave her some suggestions on where to buy clothes but a couple weeks later, she told me she still couldn’t find anything she liked.  My guess is that although she could appreciate what I was wearing, she didn’t actually see herself wearing the same stuff.  So much of our style choices is not based on what we think looks nice on others, but more about what makes us feel like our true selves.  So do you want to buy that blazer because that’s how you think you should dress?  Or do you want it because that speaks to who you really are?  I ask myself similar questions about so many aspects of life.  Do you want kids because that’s what you think you should be doing or does that speak to who you really are?  Do you want to buy a house because that’s what you think you should be doing, or is owning a home speak to what you really want?  Usually what gives me the answer is being hyperaware of that little pit in my stomach, that little twinge of regret, when I imagine doing something I don’t truly want to do.

[outfit:  elizabeth suzann linen gauze harper tunic, elizabeth suzann twill clyde work pants (old), gold toe socks, pre-owned kork ease wedge sandals]

6 thoughts on “outfit: complimented

  1. It’s so great to get a compliment in the wild. Every time I wear this one pair of wide leg linen trousers on the train, SOMEONE lets me know how much they like them. They are a very different silhouette than what’s mainstream. If I see people in public who share my style sensibilities, I usually say something to them. Affirmations are great.

    As to the question of why you do things — I used to wonder if I wanted a baby or just to be in the baby club. Spoiler alert I don’t really want either. I think it’s all fueled by FOMO — what if I don’t do this and regret it forever?? But being in touch with your true feelings is important —> “Usually what gives me the answer is being hyperaware of that little pit in my stomach, that little twinge of regret, when I imagine doing something I don’t truly want to do.”

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  2. Affirmations like that make looking different worth it. I think people can tell when others are comfortable in their clothes, like a second skin.
    I always look at ES stuff, but never buy any of it because I don’t think it speaks to me in general. The clothing is good quality and the tunic on you is really nice! I had that in my wishlist for a long time, but then took it out because I couldn’t really see myself wearing it. I think I’m like that woman who complimented you in a way – it’s nice to admire on others, but the reality would be different for me.

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  3. I feel like what I’m able to tolerate from a comfort level ends up usurping everything else. I like blazers and button-downs and turtlenecks but they are uncomfortable to me so I skip them in favor of other stuff that’s a little less constricting.

    I can also like stuff on someone else’s body type and it’s comfortable but it looks different (and unfavorable) on my 5′ 2″ frame. It’s a weird cross section of what I like and what feels okay, too.

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